Sometimes it is difficult to buy a product because we must choose from the variety of models, items, services and so on… in order to obtain a complete solution. To take advantage of opportunities for cross-selling and upselling, promotional materials must present the choices clearly.

Cross-Selling Adds More Items

Cross-selling promotes an add-on or accessory product or service that, when combined with the primary product, makes a better or complete solution. A classic example of cross-selling is the question, "Do you want fries with that?"
In many cases, cross-selling involves helping customers assemble a tailored product from a variety of options. An effective cross-sell presents these options clearly and makes it easy for customers to choose among them.


Upselling Adds More Value

Upselling promotes a more powerful or higher level model than the one the customer is considering. To use the fast-food metaphor again, an up-sell would be "The deluxe burger is not only bigger, but it includes the special sauce and only costs a little more. Would you like that instead?"

A product model that offers greater capabilities, flexibility, or capacity might be suitable for upsell. In this case, the seller's job is to make sure a customer is aware this model exists and to encourage consideration of both models before the purchase decision.

Promotional Ideas



Both cross-selling and upselling can be done in print materials and on the Web. The following ideas can be used for print materials such as brochures, catalogs, and selection guides:

* Include a brief "Related Products" section that lists the names or model numbers of upsell and cross-sell products.

* Present a chart of available options, describing the target use or environment for each.

* Describe typical packages or product combinations, especially when a customer must purchase multiple components. This can be done with a simple bullet list that describes the content of each package.

Because of the dynamic links between pages, cross-selling and upselling are especially easy to implement on a Web site. For example, you can create links among catalog pages to show related products, or link to a services page from a product page. The navigation process you define for purchase transactions on a Web site can also guide a visitor through pages that present cross-sell or upsell options.

More Choices, More Sales



If handled correctly, cross-selling and upselling can help customers choose the best products for their needs and generate a stronger customer relationship for your company. And of course, more revenue too.

Copyright(c)2006, Janice M. King. All rights reserved; used by permission. Janice is an award-winning freelance copywriter who helps technology companies around the world produce clear, compelling sales and PR materials. This article is excerpted in part from Janice's latest book, Copywriting That Sells High Tech, which has been called "a superb guide to great copy for any technology-based product or service." Learn about the book and find many valuable resources for high-tech marketing at Janice's site: http://www.writinghightech.com

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